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Anthony T. D'Annessa Memorial Scholarship

Anthony T. D'Annessa Memorial Scholarship

The Anthony T. D'Annessa memorial scholarship was established to help aspiring Welding Engineers with their college costs.  Anthony (Tony) was a first generation American from Youngstown, Ohio who decided early that education and hard work were the keys to a better life.  He learned as much as he could through high school, then joined the US Army in 1952.  With the help of the GI Bill he received his Bachelor's of Welding Engineering from Ohio State University in 1958 and his Master's of Welding Engineering in 1960.   

Tony worked on the S-86 Sabre Jet design for North American Rockwell while at OSU, then accepted a research position with Lockheed in Sunnyvale, CA after graduation.  He transferred to Lockheed's Marietta, GA plant in 1964, where (among other projects) he worked with the design and materials used in the C5A.  In 1972 he took a research position at Bell Labs/Western Electric (which later became AT&T) working with fiber optic research where he remained until he retired in 1992.  He authored numerous technical publications and held many patents.  After retirement he worked as a consultant and legal expert in court cases involving failure of metals. 

Tony D'Annessa was a lifetime member of the American Welding Society, having joined in 1961.  He served as Chair of the Welding Handbook Chapter Committee on Lead and Zinc and contributed to other Welding Handbook chapters.  While living in California, he served a term as Chair of the AWS Santa Clara Section.

The Anthony T. D'Annessa Memorial Scholarship will be awarded to a Welding Engineering student at The Ohio State University.

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