American Welding Society - 9-Year Recertification
AWS's CWI Nine-Year Recertification Seminar
The American Welding Society offers an intensive CWI nine-year recertification course. The course was created to eliminate the need for CWIs to take the physical test, and it satisfies the eighty-hour continuing education requirement for recertification.

Individuals can forego having to attend the traditional two-week session by participating in the course. The course is conducted over six days, from Sunday through Thursday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and on Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Attendees receive their AWS Certificate of Completion on the final day of the course.

CWI 9-Year Recertification Course - Background
General information about the course.

CWI 9-Year Recertification Course - Fact Sheet
Pricing, text and other relevant course facts.

Completing the Application
Remember these points and make sure your application is correct.

Inaugural 9 Year Recertification Class
Reprinted from Inspection Trends.  This brief articles highlights the inaugural course taught by Ron Theiss and Ken Coryell.


CWI 9-Year Recertification Course - Background

  • This intensive course not only satisfies the eighty hours of continuing education alternative to retesting, but is a highly-evaluated update of the CWI body of knowledge.
  • Pre-course assignment. You will be asked to complete chapters 1, 2, 3, 4 and 7 in Welding Inspection Technology and take the corresponding tests in the workbook. Both these documents will be shipped thirty days prior to the start date of the seminar. This pre-course assignment partially fulfillsthe eighty-hour requirement. Answers will be provided the first day of the program.
  • The course will start with an informal skills assessment exercise to identify what fundamentals need reinforcing.
  • Participants are asked to have ready, and be prepared to discuss, one or more real-world problems encountered on the job (non-proprietary). Problems can be technical or administrative.  Interaction among CWIs working on these problems has resulted in many innovative solutions. Students bring along any codes or other documents needed for clarification.
  • AWS Certificates of Completion will be awarded the last day of the course. Immediately following your actual nine-year renewal date, you will be sent your new CWI wallet card and wall certificate.
  • Special price includes six days of tuition, refreshment breaks, materials and textbooks, as well as recertification fees and three years of AWS membership.

Note: Eye examinations shall be performed not more than seve months prior to the date of the welding inspector recertification date. Your certificate and wallet card will be delayed if a current eye examination is not in your file. Hotel accommodations, travel and regular meals are the responsibility of the attendee. Always check the status of a seminar before making nonrefundable travel arrangements.

CWI 9-Year Recertification Course - Fact Sheet

  • Compact eighty-hour course design combines pre-seminar assignments with daytime and evening onsite sessions, directed studies, and other activities
  • Rare opportunity to meet and share experiences with other seasoned CWI professionals from a wide range of industries.
  • Interactive format offers the opportunity for CWIs to share and learn from their peers, who collectively have many years of experience.
  • Pre-seminar reading assignment includes Welding Inspection Technology, Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4 and 7, and the written answers to questions on those chapters found in the Welding Inspection Technology Workbook. This pre-seminar assignment partially fulfills the eighty-hour requirement.
  • The seminar begins with an informal skills assessment to identify the fundamental areas the instructor will cover during the course.
  • Bring with you and be prepared to discuss one or more real-world problems encountered on the job (non-proprietary). Problems can be technical or administrative and will be presented and discussed with other experienced CWIs. This interaction often results in innovative problem-solving techniques and solutions. Bring along any codes or other documents necessary for clarification.
  • Your AWS Certificate of Completion will be mailed to you within thirty days of the seminar. You will receive your new CWI wallet card and wall certificate in the month your current certification expires. Note: Eye examinations shall be performed not more than seven months prior to the date of recertification. Your certificate and wallet card will be delayed if a current eye examination form is not on file.
  • The course price of $1,625 for members and $1,840 for non-members includes textbooks and recertification fee. The non-member price also includes a three-year AWS membership.

COMPLETING THE APPLICATION
Visual Acuity Record/Eye Examination: The AWS QCI-96 Standard states the CWI must have their eye examination performed not more than seven months prior to the date of the welding inspector examination or recertification.

  • Qualifying Work Experience – Last
  • three years of employment must be documented on application.
  • Employment Verification – Must be signed by employer or supervisor.
  • Notarization-Application – will be complete when notarized.
  • Payment – can be made by credit card, check money order or purchase order (if member).

Inaugural 9-Year Recertification Class
A diverse assembly of talented people.”

The inaugural course was held in Beaumont in 1999. Two sections, one taught by Ken Coryell and the other by Ron Theiss, coordinator and professor of NDE at North Harris College in Houston, were offered. Since then, additional courses instructed by Coryell have been held at various locations nationwide. Additional courses are planned throughout 2002, about one or two per quarter.

In the following interview, Coryell shares his thoughts about the program and its value to CWIs.

Besides saving time, what are some of the other advantages gained by CWIs who take this course?
I don’t know of any other forum or opportunity where experienced CWIs – most of which have a minimum of fourteen years of experience – can come together. We go far beyond the fundamentals and get into issues that really aren’t covered in other CWI preparatory programs. You have a lot of senior, knowledgeable people focusing on welding inspection issues or a week. The issues that come up just aren’t covered in the textbooks.

It must be a unique group of individuals with a unique perspective.
Yes, people come to this from all different states and industries. There are some who come from industries like aerospace, structural, pipeline, power plant, oil, chemical, and marine D. It’s a diverse assembly of talented people. What many appreciate is that they are with other CWIs who are into areas they never get. A lot of sharing of work experiences takes place during the week.

Are field trips part of the course?
We try to do a plant visit of a local operation. The goal is to see something a little different.  Because it’s a senior-level group of inspectors, we’ve been well received. We’ve gotten some excellent “behind the scenes” tours the public doesn’t get to see. We’ve been to the Johnson Space Center outside of Houston, a shipyard in Philadelphia, a fuel fabrication shop in St. Louis that is nearly all computer operated, and a failure forensic laboratory in Miami. We visited an automobile assembly plant in Atlanta, a major welding equipment manufacturer in Cleveland and an excellent meta-llurgical testing lab in Houston. It depends on what’s available in the region where we are.

Participants must come away from this course with more than just information.
A lot of the students keep in touch by e-mail after the course. Many have become friends and call each other up; the course helped them to really connect. With this none-year group, there’s a special bonding that seems to happen. A couple of weeks ago, I was in a shop in Cleveland with a guy who was in an earlier program. He had a problem and was communicating with some of the other guys who had been in his group to help find a solution.

That’s a nice unexpected benefit.
Yes, and I don’t think that was foreseen when the course was originally conceived. Interaction is encouraged; we built in “break-out” times with smaller groups to get acquainted and discuss inspection issues and because it was helpful to talk problems through. In doing so, though, people came to realize they weren’t just “Moses in the wilderness,” and they could connect with others who had been in similar situations.